Cinlerin Efendisi – The Turkish Translation of Master of the Jinn is now an EBOOK :)

February 18, 2017

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

Cinlerin Efendisi, the Turkish translation of Master of the Jinn is now an Ebook :) To order a copy for only $3.82, click HERE. 

turkcover2

Ey dervişler! Tanrı’yı zikretmek ruhun gıdasıdır. Yaralı gönüller için merhemdir. Zikir, ilk önce, geçmişle olan bağları gevşetir ve tedricen nefsin yükümlülüklerinden azat eder. Azar azar bencillik, şehvet ve düşmanlığın izlerini silmek suretiyle yükünüzü hafifletir ve yolculuğun hızlanmasını sağlar. Bu yüzden, ilk başta yaşayabileceğiniz korku ve ıstırap görmenizi zorlaştırsa da umutsuzluğa kapılmayın. Hakikat, karanlıkta parlayan bir ışık gibidir. Görmek için, yavaş yavaş kalp gözünün açılması gerekir.

Ya Haqq!


The Sufi Way of Chivalry

February 15, 2017

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

“Do good consistently to your mother and father. Visit your kin, do not see the faults of others, keep secret their wrongdoings, and advise them only when no one can hear. Pray for the sinners and pardon their wrongdoings. Feel the evil and terror of your ego, and the shame of going along with it. Show consideration to people with compassion, kindness and goodness […] Be modest before people of knowledge. Discern the truth in what you hear and accept it. Save your tongue from lies and slander […] Be sincere and pure in your actions. See what is good and beautiful in creation. Avoid those of an evil disposition and befriend the good. Leave your wants, and throw away the desire to be praised for your achievements.”

—— Imam Sulami (d. 11th C CE) Kitab al-Futuwwah.

Ya Haqq!


The Prophet (saw) On Women

February 9, 2017

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

“Women are not created weaker but more generous than men. They are created more beautiful and less fierce, as beauty hates to hurt and harm others. That is why they seem weak to people, but in reality they are not. Angels are the strongest of created beings, and women are closer to the angelic nature than men, as they are readier than men to carry angelic light. It is the good manners and ethics of spirituality which they carry which makes them less forceful than men.”    

– Prophet Muhammad (saw)

Ya Haqq!


Master of the Jinn, the Malayalam Translation – Jinnukalude Nadhan ജിന്നുകളുടെ നാഥന്‍

January 14, 2017

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

Master of the Jinn has been translated into the Malayalam language of the Kerala State of India as Jinnukalude Nadhan – ജിന്നുകളുടെ നാഥന്‍, and published as an EBOOK by Google Play for $3.82. If you are one of the 54 million people who speak Malayalam, buy it HERE :)

Ya Haqq!

malayalam

 



Coming of the Magi

December 23, 2016

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

In the days before Christmas, I confess that one of my favorite parts of the story of the birth of Jesus, or Isa ibn Mariyam, is the coming of the Magi, and the legends that have grown up around them.

In Christian tradition, the Magi, also referred to as the Three Wise Men, Three Kings, or Kings from the East, are said to have visited the baby Jesus after his birth, bearing gifts of gold, myrrh and frankincense.

The word Magi is a Latinization of the plural of the Greek word magos, itself from Old Persian maguŝ from the religious/priestly caste into which Zoroaster was born. As part of their religion, these priests paid particular attention to the stars, and gained an international reputation for astrology, which was at that time highly regarded as a science. Their religious practices and use of astrology caused derivatives of the term Magi to be applied to the occult in general and led to the English term magic.

The Gospel of Matthew (2:1-16), the only one of the four Gospels to mention the Magi, states that they came “from the east” to worship the Christ, “born King of the Jews”. Although the account does not tell how many they were, the three gifts led to a widespread assumption that they were three as well. Their identification as kings in later Christian writings is linked to Old Testament prophesies such as that in Isaiah 60:3, which describe the Messiah being worshipped by kings.

The Syrian King Seleucus II Callinicusis recorded to have offered gold, frankincense and myrrh to Apollo in his temple at Miletus in 243 BC, and this may have been the precedent for the mention of these three gifts in the Gospel of Matthew (2:11). It was these three gifts, it is thought, which were the chief cause for the number of the Magi becoming fixed eventually at three.

A model for the homage of the Magi might have been provided, it has been suggested, by the journey to Rome of King Tiridates I of Armenia, with his magi, to pay homage to the Emperor Nero, which took place in 66 AD, a few years before the date assigned to the composition of the Gospel of Matthew.

And finally, this account by Lewis Williams expands the story in a lovely spiritual way:

While oftentimes conflicting lore muddles the story of the Magi, those bearing gifts for the Christ child are most often named Caspar of Tarsus, Melchior of Persia and Balthasar of Sabia, which was the ancient name of Yemen/Ethiopia (as in the Queen of Sheba/Sabia). Weary from desert travel, the Magi humbly offer their gifts. Caspar is young, European, and offers gold. Gold finances the Holy Family’s coming flight to Egypt and also symbolizes Christ’s immortality and purity. For his generosity, Caspar receives the gifts of charity and spiritual wealth. Melchior is middle-aged, Persian and offers myrrh. Myrrh is a fragrant gum, which the ancient Israelites believed to strengthen children. This symbol of Christ’s mortality was blended with wine and offered to him on the cross, and also mixed with aloes to wrap his body for the tomb. Melchior receives the gifts of humility and truth. Balthasar is elderly, Ethiopian and offers frankincense. Frankincense is a resin used in incense for worship and also symbolizes prayer and sacrifice. Balthasar receives the gift of Faith. And Christ, humbling himself to become man, offers us the greatest gift of all, the light that forever burns in the darkness.

Merry Christmas to all :)

Ya Haqq!

Note: The above painting is Adoration of the Magi by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617-1682).


In Memory of Dr. Javad Nurbakhsh

December 10, 2016

LS2G Love is the Answer to

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

Saturday, December 10th would have been the 90th birthday of Dr. Javad Nurbakhsh (12/10/1926 – 10/10/2008), the late and beloved Master of the Nimatullahi Sufi Order,  may God sanctify his secret. In his memory, this poem is dedicated.

Love is the answer
to every question

An ocean emerging
from a drop

This you taught us by your
every word, every action,

The revealed science
of the heart, the key

to the door of the spirit
that is never locked

To serve the One,
serve all, you said,

Eat but a little,
Feed the soul instead

As long as life
remains, and then

The drop returns
to the Ocean again,

Of Love, of Love, of Love

Ya Pir! Ya Hayy!

Ya Haqq!


Prayer for Anxiety and Sorrow

November 28, 2016

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

“Iman (faith) wears out in one’s heart, just as the dress wears out (becomes thin). Therefore, ask Allah to renew iman in your hearts.”
—Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), by Al-Hakim

Prayer for anxiety and sorrow

“O Allah, I am Your servant, child of Your male servant, child of Your female servant. My forelock is in Your hand. Your command over me is forever executed and Your decree over me is just. I ask You by every name belonging to You which You name Yourself with, or revealed in Your Book, or You taught to any of Your creation, or You have preserved in the knowledge of the unseen with You, that You make the Qur’an the life of my heart and the light of my breast, and a departure for my sorrow and a release for my anxiety.”

– Prayer hadith of the Prophet (saw),  (Musnad Ahmad)

Ya Haqq!