…the whole thing.

September 3, 2012

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

“Love is the whole thing. We are only pieces.”   – Rumi

Ya Haqq!


What Love Demands – Eid Al-Adha 2011

November 2, 2011

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

Eid Mubarak!

May Allah bless you all this Eid Al-Adha, dear Brothers and Sisters, with generosity of hand, sincerity of speech, kindness in action, and love and joy in remembrance of Him, who is the Source of all Generosity, Sincerity, Kindness, Joy, and Love.  Ameen!

“O Lord! Let not our hearts deviate now after You have guided us, but grant us mercy from Your own Presence; for You are the Grantor of bounties without measure.”  (Qur’an: 3:9)

This is the time of Eid al-Adha, the Festival of Sacrifice, which celebrates the faith of Abraham, who was willing to sacrifice even his son Isaac as God had commanded. Now what are we willing to sacrifice in order that our prayers may be accepted?

That is the question I ask myself every year. Jesus (pbuh) kissed the leper, the whore, and the thief, out of love and forgiveness and healing. Because of the great expansiveness of his heart, miracles were possible. What have we done, what can we still do, to be worthy of the love and forgiveness and healing we ask of God? The answer that comes to my heart is always the same:

Do what love demands.

Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails. -1 Corinthians 13:4-8

According to a hadith, the Prophet (pbuh) once said, “A true believer is one with whom others feel secure. One who returns love for hatred.”

Alhamdulillah! Indeed, Love is the greatest miracle of God. There have been Spiritual Masters of the past who would not let an aspirant be initiated until they had gone to everyone whom they had wronged in their life, and begged forgiveness, making amends in any way that was required. And until they had gone to everyone that had wronged them in their lives, and granted them forgiveness without asking, and with a whole heart. Only then could such a one be initiated on the mystic path.

And so we come to the great task of our lives, brought into focus on this day of Eid al-Adha: To sacrifice our fear and hatred, our envy and greed and all the other works of the fearful and self-absorbed nafs, in the certain knowledge that anyone who forgives a debt will be repaid tenfold by God, and anyone who forgives a wrong will be forgiven by God a hundredfold, and anyone who returns love for hatred will make of this life a paradise. That is what love demands.

Your task is not to seek for love,
but merely to seek and find
all the barriers within yourself
that you have built against it.
- Rumi

Ya Haqq!


The Passion of Mansur al-Hallaj

September 6, 2011

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

Hallaj’s son made report of his father and spoke freely of his father’s execution. God had revealed an attribute of himself to Hallaj, but Hallaj made it a boast. The Woolcarder had loosened the bonds of attachment to all things but himself. For this reason, God tested Hallaj with ridicule and torture and certainty of death. Even the friends of Hallaj and his disciples turned their backs on him. Did their betrayal torment him more even than the instruments his enemies used to mutilate him?

In a vision, the Woolcarder shone like the sun before me. He said, “You wonder at me. Why?”

I said, “Did you deserve the punishment you received? Were you angry that the order came from those who were once your friends?”

He said. “My execution was well deserved. I was not angry with my friends; not with Junayd who affirmed the order, nor Shebli who threw mud at me as they led me to the gibbet. They were my friends; they are my friends still. I embrace them. When they cut off my hands, I performed my ablutions with my own blood. When they hacked off my feet, I crawled before his throne. When they put out my eyes, I saw only His Face. When they cut out my tongue, His name was still upon my lips. When they cut off my head and burned me to ashes and scattered me to the winds, I loved God still. For this, He answered all my prayers. He loved me and I loved Him. He removed the veil of the world from my mutilated eyes. He fulfilled the promise I made when I cried out “I am the Truth” by utterly destroying me. I prophesied my union with Him and the people arose to punish my blasphemy; yet through their punishment, my prophecy and His promise came to pass.”

These are the words Hallaj spoke to me. God forgive me for loving him.
Da’ud Ibn Ibrahim al-Shawni, The End of Reason.

When Mansur al-Hallaj reached his utmost friendship with God, he became his own enemy and gave away his life. He said, “I am God,” meaning, “I have passed away. God alone remains.” This is extreme humility. Your saying “Thou art God, and I am Your servant,” is arrogance, for you have affirmed your own existence, and created dualism, for until “I” exists “He” is impossible. Therefore it was God alone who said, “I am God,” since Mansur had passed away.“

- Rumi, From Discourse 52  of the Fihi Ma Fihi, Translated by A. J. Arberry.

Ya Haqq!


“…there’s really only one work.”

June 21, 2011

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

“And watch two men washing clothes, one makes dry clothes wet. The other makes wet clothes dry. They seem to be thwarting each other, but their work is a perfect harmony. Every holy person seems to have a different doctrine and practice, but there’s really only one work.”   –  Rumi

Ya Haqq!


May God Have Mercy on Those Who Lead the Way

May 15, 2011

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

May God have mercy on those who lead the way
and those who come behind,
and those who fulfill their vows,
and those who seek to fulfill them,
with His Grace and bounty,
…His great benefits and favors!
For He is the best object of petition
and the noblest object of hope;
and God is the best protector and the most merciful
of those who show mercy.

Amin!

- Rumi

Ya Haqq!


Rumi’s Wedding Night – Dec. 17, 1273

December 16, 2010

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

On December 17th, 1273 AD, Mevlana Jalal al-din Rumi died at Konya. The 17th of December is thus called Sheb-i Arus, meaning ‘Bride’s Night” or ‘Nuptial Night’ or ‘Wedding Night,’ because of the union of Mevlana with God. As Rumi’s epitaph states:

‘When we are dead, seek not our tomb in the earth, but find it in the hearts of men.’

Rumi was a universally loved genius, one of the greatest servants of humanity, founder of the Mevlevi Sufi Brotherhood, his poetry and doctrine advocates unlimited tolerance, positive reasoning, goodness and charity, and awareness through love. Looking with the same eye on Muslim, Jew and Christian alike, his peaceful and tolerant teaching has reached men of all sects and creeds.

Love and imagination are magicians

Who create an image of the Beloved in your mind

With which you share your secret intimate moments.

This apparition is made of nothing at all,

But from its mouth comes the question,

“Am I not your Loved One?”

And from you the soft reply, “Yes. Yes. Yes.”

~ Rumi ~

Inna lillahi wa-inna ilayi raji’un.
(We belong to God and to God are we returning)

 

Ya Haqq!


The Knowing Heart

September 21, 2010

Salaam and Greetings of Peace:

“The Sufis have been the educators of hearts for at least fourteen centuries. Their teaching and methods are based neither upon dogma nor conjecture, but upon a divine and objective foundation which is the primordial religion of humanity.

“Sufism does not offer salvation in the sense of a guarantee of heaven in the afterlife. Sufism offers a path to complete humanness, a state in which the spiritual and the human are unified, in which the world of spiritual qualities and material existence are seen as one.

“This education is empirical, practical, and integrated with daily life. At the same time it is attuned to the most transcendent Truth. This education is a unified whole, but it touches on so many areas of experience: individual psychology, relationships, marriage, family, community, livelihood, creativity, and worship.”

We are the mirror as well as the face in it.

We are drunk on this life of God.

We are both the pain and its cure.

We are the fresh, cool water

and the jar that pours.

Rumi (Quatrain 1652)

From The Knowing Heart: A Sufi Path of Transformation by Kabir Helminski

Ya Haqq!


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